Skip to content Skip to navigation

Time to bring work culture back

The Father of the Nation, Mahatma Gandhi had expressed his views on the importance of 'healthy work culture' in the Harijan newspaper of 15th October,1938, emphasizing on hard work by the people of the country for attaining the goal of freedom. He dared to declare that 'declaring his birthday as a holiday should be treated as a cognizable offence'. This was a clear indication that the 'Great Soul' was confident of the might of his people, which later on succeeded in bringing freedom to the country. His experiments on Swadeshi movement brought good results. But it seems that the present situation has completely changed the whole thing and Mahatma’s dreams are shattered.

Unfortunately, with his assassination on January,30,1948, his ideals and teachings were thrown out in the wilderness by the people whom he trusted most.. His followers used his name, teachings and ideals for making wealth and property by playing politics. His soul might have felt ‘tremendous pain’ on the day the Government of India declared his birthday, the 2nd October, as a National Holiday. This decision, ignoring the Great Soul’s wishes, was great dishonor to him. Since that day the ruling parties in the country started distancing from his ideals. No doubt they kept crying for Gandhian philosophy and remembering his ideals at every critical times. Ignoring his sentiments and ideals for long sixty seven years, efforts are on to underplay his teachings and increasing holidays from time to time, with intention to make the people idle by reducing their working capability. It is only in India, where maximum holidays are allowed. The practice of demanding more and more holidays in the industries and offices are continuing regularly. It is unfortunate, when the country needs more work for development and prosperity, our people demand more holidays. More holidays means reduction in working capability of our people. On the one hand, when there is necessity for hard work due to economic globalization to counter the challenges of multinational organizations; our country prefers reducing working ability of our people.

Whereas there is necessity of increasing ‘work culture’ to bring the country at par with developed nations, the tradition of increasing holidays at work places leads to reducing working potential of our people. Politicians and trade unions are equally responsible for this sort of affairs. Mere slogans cannot lead the nation on the path of progress. It needs hard work and foresightedness in planning. Development needs more hard work and fewer holidays. Developed nations increase production by reducing holidays and increasing working hours to increase per capita working capability. In Indian politics there is a ‘conspiracy’ going on to reduce capability of our people. Power hungry politicians having interest in multinational companies are busy to get the benefit out of this practice.

Our trade union leaders ‘mislead’ the workforce over various issues demanding to keep their leadership alive. It is unfortunate; these leaders demand more holidays and other benefits instead of encouraging the workers to increase production, so that the industry is compelled to pay them more. Due to high illiteracy and lack of right understanding, exploitation of workforce is continuing in the country. Working force fail to understand whether their prosperity depends on more work or on holidays. Government of India has adopted the policy of five days working in a week, which ultimately leads to delaying disposal of works. Not only this, out of 365 days of year, about 25 National, 104 Sundays and Saturdays, besides 65 privilege leaves, casual and medical leaves, provisions are already there. In this way about 200 days of the year a worker enjoys as holidays.

The state governments on the other hand declare a few local and festival holidays in addition to all these. Another fact that shows that the ‘bandh culture’ has spread in the country at large scale on various issues and petty matters..Any organization gives a bandh call and it is found that the people give good response to that and enjoy extra holidays. As much misuse and negligence of human resources is done in India, nowhere in the world one can find. Several small nations have attained their position in the developed countries because of proper use of human resources and our  India is lagging behind even after 67 years of independence.. It is not enough to pay homage to the Great Soul by putting flowers on his Samadhi from time to time. It is time to follow his ideals and make the country self sufficient in the fields of agriculture and industries, which can provide work for all and prosperity for the country. With the change of the guards at the top of the country under the Prime Minister Narendra Modi, the people seem to have respite as he has promised all-round development of the country. The time is awaited to see the result.

Author info

Daya Nath Singh's picture

Journalist; Guwahati Press Club office Secretary

Add new comment

Republish

Republish this content

Jesuit-Salesian study notes development induced displacement in Sikkim

25 Nov 2016 - 8:30pm | CM Paul

A major study on displacement of peoples in Sikkim was released at a 3-day International Seminar on “North East: Peoples, Power and Perspectives” held at Sikkim Central University, Tadong.
At the inaugural session of the seminar on 24 November 2016, Vice Chancellor, Prof. T.B. Subba released the Jesuit-Salesian authored book Teesta on the Run: Development-Induced Displacement in Sikkim, 1975-2010.

The study lists some 65,000 people in Sikkim are victims of development induced displacement, i.e. more than 10 per cent of the entire population of the state. The statistics for development induced displaced population for the entire country numbers more than 65 million people.

The Department of Economics, Salesian College Sonada assisted the Director of North East Social Research Centre, Guwahati, Dr Walter Fernandes in the research project funded by ICSSR, New Delhi.
The field work included gathering the land alienation for various projects from the district level land records and gathering the status of the displaced persons from over 300 interview questionnaires undertaken by a team of four researchers.

Jesuit Father (Dr) Fernandes at his intervention prior to the release of the book highlighted the findings of the study saying, “Sikkim, has had 10% of its relatively small population in the mountainous state displaced and the vast majority have not been adequately compensated nor rehabilitated.”

The 352-page study was part of an All India effort to create a reliable data base with the hope of making a contribution to awareness building among the Displaced Persons - Project Affected Peoples and decision makers about the need to develop policies in favour of the marginalized.

Among three authors of the study are Dr Walter Fernandes, Prof. George Thadathil and Ms Bitopi Dutta.

Dr Fernandes is former director of Indian Social Institute (New Delhi) and 22 years editor of Social Action (1977-99) as well as founder director of North Eastern Social Research Centre (NESRC) Guwahati (2000-11) and director of research at Animation and Research Centre, Yangoon (2013-15). He is at present Senior Fellow at NESRC.

Principal of Salesian College Sonada-Siliguri and author of Vision from the Margin (2007) Prof Thadathil has five edited volumes and over 30 published articles. He is also the series editor of SALESIAN - Journal of Humanities and Social Sciences, and director of Salesian Research Centre.

Formerly Research Associate at NESRC after her Masters from TISS Mumbai (2012) Ms Dutta has studied development induced displacement, traditional tribal conflict resolution methods and gender and sexuality. She also co-founded the first queer collective called Xukia.

Even though the Supreme Court interpreted Article 21 of the Constitution on right to life as every citizen’s right to a life with dignity, studies indicate that those who pay the price and get the benefits of development belong to two different classes.

Dr Fernandes says, “That possibility turns displacement into a human rights issue and provides socially conscious scholars with a platform to intervene in the debate on the impact of development on the livelihood losers.”

The first phase of the study for 1975-2007 in Sikkim and 1947-2007 in Nagaland was done in these two states together and was completed in June 2011.

In 2014-15, the above study’s Sikkim section was separated and updated to 2010, and is published in the present volume.

While chapter 1 gives the core concepts, chapter 2 discusses the methodology of study and chapter 3 presents the background of Sikkim. The remaining chapters give quantitative data on land loss and displaced people. The concluding chapter has suggestions for conclusive development.

Most decision makers view development only as economic or GDP growth and building infra structure and consider displacement linked to it sad but inevitable.

On the other side those who want inclusive development hold that economic and social growth should go hand in hand and that one cannot be sacrificed for the other. They are of the view that in the present situation those who are deprived of their sustenance in the name of national development and those who get its benefits belong to two different classes and that the former are impoverished for the comforts of the latter.

The study on which this publication is based tested this hypothesis through a quantitative data base on the extent of land used for projects from 1975 to 2010 and the number of displaced persons. It then looked at the impact on those who pay the price of development.

In the end, one is left with the impression that the GDP growth based view prevails in development planning in India. Hence, the authors recommend new approaches to be found not merely to rehabilitation but also to the laws and to technical aspects of the project that deprive people of their livelihood.

Tangla College students visit Kalaigaon park

29 Oct 2016 - 12:03pm | Jayanta Kumar Das
More than 30 students of Tangla College with botany as major subject visited Kanaklata Das Bio-diversity Park at Kalaigaon on October 28.The members of the team studied various locally available species of plants,creepers, grasses including a few rare species namely -white sandal wood,red sandal wood, Ashoka,Arjunas,Bhairas etc.The members of the team also studied a few species of local plants with medicinal values.Students were delighted to watch thousands of water birds ,birds and species of fauna.It was known that the bio-diversity park was established in 2009  at a plot of land measuring 10 acres,which was donated by Freedom Fighter Late Pani Ram Das for the establishment of the man made forest for smaller animals and wild birds with a water tank of the size of 200 m X 100 m.The park had been attracting several species of water birds during last seven years.It also houses various species of reptiles and smaller wild animals namely-Cobra,mongoose,monitor lizard,patrige, python, tokay gecko,jungle fowl etc.The team was guided by Sarojini Talukdar,HOD,Dept of Botany;Anima Bhuan,HOD,Dept of Zoology;Anaru Boro, Associate professor,Dept of Botany,Tangla College.

 

 

Depression- from breakdown to breakthrough

5 Apr 2016 - 9:24am | Ma Prem Naina

Marilyn Monroe, Robin Williams, Ernest Hemingway and back home in India, Nafisa Joseph, Viveka Babaji, Jiah Khan, more recently Pratyusha Banerjee, their way of choosing death reveals that their famous lifestyles are not as bright as the sparkling spotlights they walk through. More so, it is often a case of ignoring that darker side of life which, if consciously tackled, could become a breakthrough.

Today the world we live in is a complex phenomenon, intertwined with several dynamics such as relationships, ambition, competition, anger, jealousy etc. Often, we all go through varied moods, and many of us have experienced depression, anxiety and stress. But taking one’s own life is an extreme case of depression. The WHO estimated 350 million people of all ages suffering from depression globally and if the warning signs are ignored, it may result in loss of life.

The real art consists not in destroying the body because the body is beautiful and it has not done any wrong. The soul is beautiful, but between the body and the soul there is something which is neither body nor soul. This in-between phenomenon is the mind. People commit suicide not because they are really finished with life but because life is not fulfilling their demands. But no life ever fulfills anybody's demands. One will always go on missing something or other: if s/he has money, s/he may not be beautiful; if one is beautiful, s/he may not be intelligent; if one is intelligent, s/he  may not have money.

This mind gives us ambition, jealousy, competition, violence, and all kinds of ugly diseases. But this mind can be transcended, this mind can be put aside. This mind is not a must. One just have to know the knack of it.

Depression is nothing but repression. Depression means that somehow anger is within us in a negative state: depression is a negative state of anger. When anger is pressed too much it becomes sadness. Sadness is a negative way of being angry, the feminine way of being angry and if we remove the pressure on it, it will become anger. The anger we are carrying within us about certain things from childhood but have not expressed them, becomes depression. The problem is that depression cannot be solved, because it is not the real problem. The real problem is anger and we go on condemning depression. It is like fighting with shadows.

We have been taught and we have learned it well to look happy on the surface, go on smiling, but deep down holding great rage. We cannot express it so we are sitting upon it and that is what depression is. If we let this anger flow, depression will go.

Osho explains, “When depressed, be depressed. Simply be depressed. Don't get depressed about your depression. Don't fight it, don't create any diversion, don't force it to go. Just allow it to happen; it will go by itself. Life is a flux; nothing remains the same. You are not needed; the river moves by itself, you don't have to push it. If you are trying to push it, you are simply foolish. The river flows by itself. Allow it to flow. If you fight it, you will create a secondary depression that is dangerous. The first depression is beautiful, God-given. The second depression is your own. It is not God-given; it is mental. Then you will move in mental grooves. They are infinite.

If you get depressed, be happy that you are depressed and allow the depression to be. Then suddenly the depression will disappear and there will be a breakthrough. No clouds will be there and the sky will be clear. For a single moment, heaven opens for you. If you are not depressed about your depression you can contact, you can commune, you can enter this heavenly gate. And once you know it, you have learned one of the ultimate laws of life: that life uses the opposite as a teacher, as a back-ground.”

Depression needs a non-accepting mind. The mind will deny and reject. "No" is basic. Even happiness will be rejected by such a mind. A non-accepting mind will "non-accept" anything, but if one can accept his/her loneliness, depression, sadness, then s/he is transcending already. Acceptance is transcendence.

For people in relationships, Osho shares a beautiful mantra- “Make outer relationships and make inner relationships also. Of course there are bound to be outer relationships - you move in the world, business relationships will be there - but they should not be all. They have their part to play, but there must be something absolutely secret and private, something that you can call your own. That is what Marilyn Monroe lacked. She was a public woman - successful, yet completely a failure. While she was at the top of her success and fame, she committed suicide. Why she committed suicide has remained an enigma. She had everything to live for; you cannot conceive of more fame, more success, more charisma, more beauty, more health. Everything was there, nothing could be improved upon, and still something was lacking. The inside, the within, was empty. Then, suicide is the only way.

Unless you have something inside you which is not dependent on anything outside, which is just your own - a world, a space of your own where you can close your eyes and move, and you can forget that anything else exists. Life arises from that inner source and spreads into the sky outside. There has to be a balance.”

Depression is becoming common because the individual has not been allowed to express himself or herself. Osho has devised a revolutionary meditation technique for the modern man and it is called Dynamic Meditation. Done in the early morning, this meditation is expression. In expressing himself/herself, in catharting all that has been repressed in the unconscious, s/he will be unburdened, will become saner, healthier. Such methods and devices can transform the breakdown into a breakthrough.