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Citizenship to Hindu migrants, anti-Constitutional: Mahasangha

India is a multi-ethnic, multi-religious country. But under the leadership of PM Modi, the government is all up to provide Indian citizenship to illegal migrants on the basis of religion. Assam is primarily a state of Mongoloid races. The Modi led BJP government is lending precedence to the systematic approach of the former governments in reducing the ruling Mongoloid classes in their own lands to a minority, better said slavery.

“Some 80 lac people belonging to the Hindu community who fled to India following the 1965 and 1971 Indo-Pak War from East Pakistan will be given Indian citizenship destroying in the process the fabric of the indigenous people,” echoed Asom Sanmilita Mahasangha, President, Chandra Kanta Terang in an urgent communiqué.

The Asom Sanmilita Mahasangha is an umbrella organization of 40 strong indigenous organizations representing the aboriginal and indigenous populations of Assam cutting across belief systems.

During the indigenous peoples’ convention held in Jorhat on April 25, 26 recently, the Mahasangha expressed grave concern on what it calls PM Modi’s divisive and communal rationale.

The Mahasangha vide its resolution (13), strongly condemned the Modi led BJP government for dividing and favoring Hindu migrants on the basis of religion calling the attempt an ill-intended conspiracy.

The Mahasangha demanded that illegal migrants must all be considered migrants irrespective of being by belief system, Hindus, Muslims, Buddhists or Christians and dealt with under the due provisions of the country.

Vide resolution 14, the Mahasangha held that during and after the  two Indo-Pak Wars, migrants have settled from East Pakistan in the tribal belts, hills, forest lands, grazing patches, Satra (Namghar) properties, the sand isles and bars, the towns, cities and encroached upon government lands, burnt down indigenous settlements resorting to racial extermination from time to time fomenting unrest among the resident populations (Hindus and Muslims) and therefore, the decision to grant Indian citizenship selectively to Hindus alone by the Modi led government has been strongly condemned.

This is a tremendous blow to the multi ethno religious foundation of India and an anti-Constitutional effort stated the Mahasangha.

The Mahasangha declared that in keeping with the Constitution of India and the prevailing law, migrants who entered Assam post 1951 shall not be allowed to stay back.

Notably, BJP President Amit Shah during his Assam visit on April 26 declared that Hindus from Bangladesh will be given Indian citizenship if the BJP comes to power in Assam in the 2016 elections. 

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Syed Miraz Ahmed's picture

Writes, edits and researches. In 2013 he was conferred the Rotary International District 3240 Young Achiever Award for his work in the area of environment and digital journalism. In 2006 he was awarded first in the category of Wildlife Photography by the Department of Environment & Forests and Tourism, Government of Assam.

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Climate Compatible Development Film fest held

19 Dec 2015 - 9:00am | Bg Gogoi

The Climate Compatible Development Film Festival kickstarted the first of its regional screening in Guwahati on Friday December 19. Three  films produced by the Climate & Development Knowledge Network (CDKN), and in partnership with Television Trust for Environment and the Assam Times Foundation, the film screening’s objective was to galvanise discussion around climate change, it’s impact on indigenous communities in the North East, lack of representation of women in climate change negotiations and the power of film to spur discussion and action on climate change, especially amongst youth groups. 

The 3 films: For a safer future – Insights on climate resilience from India; The forgotten women in India’s climate plans; Climate change and migration in Bangladesh – Living on the go, tell stories on the impact of climate change on diverse communities from Uttarakhand to Karnataka. Loss of livelihoods, distress migration, destruction of crops and fisheries, is the reality that many face on a day-to-day basis. And yet there are inspiring change strategies adopted by communities, such as in Gorakhpur, Uttar Pradesh, where different stakeholders, such as government, communities, and civil society have come together to create climate compatible development. 

The panel discussion following the film screenings facilitated in bringing the diverse environmental and climate change issues in Assam and the North East. Sanjin Sanbapandit states that “we should not get ‘panicky’ about communities cutting trees”, in drawing attention to the livelihoods of forest dependent communities and also stating that felled trees should be re-planted, and that in contrast the 100,000’s of vehicle on Guwahati’s road were doing more damage. In taking individual responsibility for mitigating climate change, Mubina Akhtar, Environmental Journalist and Activist, also demanded critical reflection from the middle class who cannot even take minor power cuts.  

Today’s auditorium at NEDFi House was full with a largely young audience who enthusiastically engaged with speakers on the role of civil society in climate change, the changing landscape of the North East and the lived realities of people’s lives in Dhemaji district. A member from Dhemaji district informed the audience of how he spent 4-5 years living on the embankment of the River Gai as a result of having been displaced due to flooding. Increased sand deposition in the district has led to drastic changes in the geography and the livelihoods of the district. 

Yet, despite the seriousness of the impact of climate change and environmental issues on people’s livelihoods and women, these largely remain outside of mainstream media. Dr. Shalini Sharma of Department of Ecology & Environment, Tata Institute of Social Science, Guwahati, put the issue on the table in saying that “environment is a hardcore political issue” and explained that media houses and institutions in the region were disinclined to cover serious environmental issues, something that needs to change as we move to facing the realities of climate change. 

Dr. Shalini Sharma also highlighted the politics of women’s participation in climate change negotiations and the need to open up ‘political corridors’ for women’s representation in these spaces. Dr Polly Vauquline, Women’s Studies, Gauhati University, highlighted the need for more informative research on the gendered dimensions of climate change and in particularly representing the diversity of North Eastern women. The film screenings drew consensus from the audience that similar films were needed to showcase the impact of climate change on the women of the North East and the role of oral storytelling in bringing women’s perspectives in climate change policies. 

 

3 Cong leaders appointed poll observers

12 Apr 2014 - 8:14pm | AT News

AICC has on Saturday appointed three Congress leaders as poll observers for three Lok Sabha constituencies in West Bengal for the upcoming polls in the state.

According to sources, Nazira MLA Debobrata Saikia has been given the charge of Raigarh while his Thowa counterpart Sushanta Buragohain will look after the poll affairs in Maldah constituency.

In the same order, the party has appointed Nabajeet Talukdar as the poll observer in Purulia constituency in West Bengal.

Lucid Recess releases second offering

4 May 2010 - 12:33pm | Aiyushman Dutta


Following the huge success of the debut offering ‘Carved’, Lucid Recess – one of the top bands of the Northeast – recently released their second album, Engraved Invitation. The album was released by veteran musicians Utpal Barsaikia and JP Das at a simple ceremony in the Guwahati Press Club.


Undoubtedly one of the tightest outfits to have come out from the Northeast in recent times, the rise of Lucid Recess has been simply amazing. But their rise should mostly be credited to a lot of hard work and perseverance. Formed in 2004, the band is made up of two brothers – Siddharth and Amitabh Barooah – along with talented drummer Partha Boro.


The band’s new album, Engraved Invitation’, is supported by Rock Street Journal (RSJ) and ‘Grey and Saurian’. The album is a collection of 12 new songs that has been brought out in a highly professional manner. The first 1,000 copies of the special audition comes with a 20-page booklet, band poster and sticker in a handmade box. Talking about professionalism, Lucid Recess has been highly instrumental in ushering in the wave of professionalism in the region – be it their attitude towards music or even their penchant towards perfection.


The first and only band from Assam to have been selected for the prestigious Great Indian Rock Festival, organized by Rock Street Journal (RSJ), Lucid Recess has a number of firsts to its credit. The band was the first from Assam to have been selected for the Kingfisher Pub Rock Fest, which was held in the Indian cities of Bangalore, Kolkata, Shillong and Guwahati. The band became the first from the entire region to achieve a circulation figure of 42,000 for their album, when their debut album ‘Carved’ was distributed with the Rock Street Journal.


Besides being the only rock outfit from Assam to have won a award for best composition in a web portal competition, the band has also collaborated with professionals abroad while producing the videos for their album. The video of the song “Painstaking Obsession’ from ‘Carved’ was created and directed by Reuben Issae in United Kingdom with a cast comprising of postgraduate students of the University of Surrey in the UK.