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Heart awareness rally in the city

Guwahati: City-based Dispur Hospitals in association with ‘The Heart’, a non-government organization, have organized an awareness rally on the occasion of World Heart Day on 29 September in the morning hours on streets of the pre-historic city, said the organisers in a press meet held in Guwahati Press Club on Saturday.

Created by the World Heart Federation, the heart day updates people around the globe that the cardiovascular disease, including heart disease & stroke, remains the leading cause of human death. Moreover it highlights the probable actions for individuals to prevent and control the disease.

“Over 17.9 million people die from CVDs worldwide every year and according to the World Health Organization, more people die from the heart related diseases than from any other cause and it can be checked to a larger extent by educating people on various risk factors like tobacco use, unhealthy diet and physical inactivity,” said Dr Chandan Modak, senior cardiologist of Dispur Hospitals.

Addressing the media persons, another senior cardiologist Dr Banajit Chowdhury informed that the heart is the strongest muscle in the body and it starts beating before one’s birth. Although impressive and strong, a human heart can also be vulnerable from habitual risk factors like smoking, eating an unhealthy diet or putting it under stress.”

Controlling these key risk factors and monitoring the blood pressure regularly one may reduce the risk of CVD. The system can also be weakened from a pre-existing heart condition and other physiological factors, including hypertension or high blood cholesterol, added Dr Chowdhury.

Nabajyoti Pathak, a journalist turned social activist disclosed that the prevalence of heart disease and stroke has increased by over 50% from 1990 to 2016 in India, with an increase observed in every State. The contribution of these diseases to total deaths and disease burden in the country has almost doubled in the past 25 years, he added. Awareness is the key factor in preventing heart disease. Also awareness about symptoms like chest pain, palpitation, shortness of breath on exertion, sudden faints, swelling of legs which may be the alarming signs of heart disease is necessary for prompt treatment and recovery. Every year the World Heart Day reminds it for each and every resident of the planet.

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Senior journalist based in Guwahati.

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Explosives recovered by army

23 Mar 2009 - 3:42am | Bikash Das
The 6th Rajput Regiment of the Indian Army deployed under Red Horns Division today recovered huge stock of explosives from Shilbharal village under Kamalpur PS in Kamrup district. The troops of Red Horns Division recoverd these explosives from the house of one Mansur Ali acting on specific information. Army recovered 170 nos. of Detenators, 67 nos. of electronic detenators, 50 mtrs. of Cordtex, &0 kgs of Amonium Nitrate and 15 kgs of other explosives from his house. The main accused Mansur Ali managed to escape. Army has suspected Mansur Ali as explosive suplier for various militant groups.

Cong leader targets media

28 Mar 2014 - 3:28pm | AT News

A section of Congress leaders seem to have targeted media in the poll campaigns these days.

Sonari MLA Sarat Borkotoky on Friday accused a section of media of campaigning for BJP. In his address at a poll rally in Sonari to campaign for BK Handique, the aged political leaders said that section of media has already been sold to BJP and that’s why, they are averse to give any publicity of what Handique has done.

He, however, said that Handique will win the poll with flying colours.

Last of the Tatooed Head Hunters screened in cannes

7 Jun 2010 - 10:46pm | Aiyushman Dutta


The recently selected LAST OF THE TATTOOED HEAD HUNTERS - a 15 minute film on the head hunting Konyak Nagas of northern Nagaland, produced by Hawksbill Production and presented by Dwijendra Chalachitra Pratisthan in the 63rd Cannes Film Festival was screened on 15th May 2010 with a large gathering.The film was given a loud applause from the audiences because of the rarity of the subject matter. The realistic making of the film created by director Vikeyeno Zao and the artistic cinematography by Indrajit Narayan Dev was a rare feat for the viewers at auditorium No: 3 at the The Grand Lumiere Theatre at Cannes. Viewers from US, Canada, Italy, France, UK, Isreal and a host of other celebrated dignitaries representing from different countries of the world were present at the screening.


This film has created a landmark in the history of films produced from the North East India. The Nagas, especially the Konyak Nagas are distinctively projected to the world with the regions' geography and its people. The film opens doors to the rest of world to know our people more and visit our lands.


Last of the tattooed head hunters is an attempt to capture the glorious head-hunting tradition of the Konyak Nagas. One of the fiercest among all the Naga tribes, the Konyak Nagas continued the practice till the end of the twentieth century. “The film is based on the ritualistic details connected with the head hunting tradition of the Konyaks, with attempts also being made to project their traditions and ancient customs. The principle reason for making this film is to tell the people about the tattooed head hunters before they are gone,” said Vikeyeno Zao.


Today, the Konyaks like most of the Naga tribes are Christians. With the advent of modernity into their lands the young generation have all but forgotten their past traditions and culture and are forward looking along with the rest of the world. However a dilemma faces these brave and hardy people today, and it is a political one. Vikeyeno explains, “In 1972, when the international border between India and Myanmar was demarcated, the border was drawn right through their villages, and even through their homes. No consideration was given to the rights of the Konyaks to live as one people in one country. Today their wish to live as a homogeneous tribe face an uncertain future. This documentary film aims to project the Konyaks in their homeland, their traditions and ancient customs and their plight today and a presentation to the world about these last tattooed Konyak Naga Tribes before they are gone forever.”


The screening of the film on the film in Cannes has also been featured prominently in the blog of eminent Paris-based media journalist Helen Dobrensky.