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Fate of D-voters rests on authority

The Election Commission on Wednesday left the fate of D-voters on the competent authority.

Addressing a press conference, chief election commissioner VS Sampath said that allowing or disallowing D voters to participate in the upcoming Lok Sabha polls is a matter of the competent authority to decide.

He, however, suggested the government to take steps to ensure early disposal of these cases. Notably, several opposition parties at times have been demanding voting rights for the doubtful voters.

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Dispur,Kohima order probe into Golaghat lathicharge

17 Sep 2010 - 7:27pm | editor


Assam Chief Minister Tarun Gogoi and his Nagaland counterpart Neiphu Rio have ordered probe into the recent lathicharge in Golaghat by Nagaland armed forces. An apex Naga students body has also expressed grave concern over the action of Nagaland police personnel on demonstrators of All Assam Students Union in Golaghat district of the neighbouring state.


Condemning the police lathicharge Naga Students Federation has asserted that such attitude towards the peaceful demonstrators was totally an act of disrespect.


A statement issued by NSF said, the federation, therefore, invokes the conscious of the authority concerned and the police personnel to restrain from such unwanted situation especially towards our neighbouring state in order to avoid creating any misunderstanding as we are living in peaceful co-existence"


Extending its solidarity to the injured protesters and support towards the demand of the AASU, the NSF also urged upon the Nagaland government to seriously examine the incident and take up necessary action. Twenty five people, mostly, students were injured, some of them seriously, when IRB personnel of Nagaland police passing through Golaghat district unleashed baton charge on demonstrators who blocked the NH-39 on near Rangajan Tinali.


Flood alert: ‘unprecedented’ volume of water flows down Brahmaputra

View of Bodatighat of Brahmaputra in Bihpuria. Photo by UB Photos
2 Sep 2018 - 11:13am | AT News

A massive cloudburst in Tibet has forced authorities in China to release more water down the Brahmaputra than at any time over the last 50 years. China has warned India about the release in the transboundary river – known as Yarlung Zangbo in China – and two Indian states are on high alert for floods.

The discharge was measured at 9,020 cubic metres per second (cumec) at 8 a.m. on August 29 and led to huge waves on the Siang in Arunachal Pradesh, the state in northeastern India through which the river enters India. Eyewitness reports estimated the wave heights at up to four metres, in a river that usually has hardly any waves at all.

In contrast, the discharge on August 14 had been measured at 8,070 cumec, according to India’s Central Water Commission. The Siang joins two other rivers downstream to form the Brahmaputra.

Tamiyo Tatak, the Deputy Commissioner of East Siang district in Arunachal Pradesh, sent out a warning the same day, asking people “to refrain themselves from venturing into Siang river for fishing, swimming etc. to avoid any eventualities. Further, people living in low lying areas (both right bank and left bank) viz. Jarku, Paglek, SS Mission, Jarkong, Banskota, Berung, Sigar, Borguli, Seram, Kongkul, Namsing, MER nearby Siang river are advised to remain alert but not to panic.”

Eyewitness reports on the morning of August 31 said the waves had gone down, but the Siang was still flowing at a far higher level than usual, even during the height of the monsoon.

Despite the official warning, 30 people were reported stranded on an island in the Siang in the Sille-Oyan area on the morning of August 31. The Arunachal Pradesh government has requested the Indian Air Force to send helicopters that can winch these people to safety, since the island is too small for a helicopter to land.

Assam on high alert too

Further downstream, the Assam State Disaster Management Authority (ASDMA) warned the Dibrugarh district administration in the eastern part of the state to be on high alert. Laya Maduri, the Deputy Commissioner of Dibrugarh district, sent out an order on August 30.

It read, “Flood warning has been received from ASDMA that as a result of release of excess water by Chinese Government, there may be unprecedented rise in the water level in the river Brahmaputra thereby causing severe flood. Therefore, officers of district are asked not to leave Headquarter…”

Reports on the morning of August 31 said the Brahmaputra was flowing high in Dibrugarh, but had not crossed the danger mark yet.

Transboundary cooperation

Authorities in India were able to prepare for this 50-year high in Brahmaputra water discharge well in advance, due to the warning provided by the Chinese authorities. China resumed providing water flow data to India this May under a Memorandum of Understanding (MoU) between the two countries. The data supply had been stopped in 2017. Observers in India blamed that on a face-off between the Chinese and Indian armies along their 3,500-km Himalayan border, though the Chinese authorities had said they were upgrading their water level measuring stations.

Since 2009, thethirdpole.net has consistently advocated for closer cooperation between China and India over the transboundary river Brahmaputra, which later flows into Bangladesh to join the Ganga. The scope of the MoU has been expanded over the years, but far more is possible.

Noted Brahmaputra expert Partha Jyoti Das told thethirdpole.net, “It is good that China is now regularly providing hydrological data through the monsoon period, but a lot more can be done. We need topographical data as well. That will tell us where landslides are likely to occur after heavy rain, and then we can foresee the possibilities of a flood even earlier.”

In the absence of any water flow data from the Chinese government in 2017, there had been panic in Arunachal Pradesh and Assam in November that year, when the sediment load in the river went up all of a sudden and the water almost ran black for a number of days. Independent experts from India had later said the high sediment load was due to an earthquake in Tibet, which had led to a landslide blocking the water flow in the river for some time, before it all came roaring down together.

Anamika Barua, who teaches at Indian Institute of Technology, Guwahati, has explored possibilities of regular flow of information between China and India on the Brahmaputra, through civil society channels as well as the governments. The panic in 2017 may have been avoided if some of her recommendations had been acted upon by academics in China.

Das was critical of the central and Assam governments in India for not sharing any information with the people on last November’s episode. “Have they done any studies on why this happened? If they have, why don’t they share their results in public? What the government says is important. Without that, there can be a lot of unnecessary panic.”

 By Joydeep GuptaFirst Published in The Third Pole

No let-up in Assam flood fury

25 Aug 2009 - 2:31pm | editor

Flood waters refuse to recede in Assam on Tuesday. The situation is taking a grim turn where half the area of the Karizanga National Park was submerged by the surging waters of the Brahmaputra, forcing exodus of animals to safer places.


On the other hand, worst-hit Dhemaji district continues to remain cut off for the 11 day as the NH-52 was submerged by waters of the Brahmaputra. Half of the 820 sq km area of Kaziranga, a World Heritage site and home to the endangered one-horned rhinoceros, was submerged. Meanwhile, forest department have built high platforms but there was large-scale exodus of animals to the hills of neighbouring Karbi Anglong district by crossing the adjoining National Highway.


Authorities have enforced restriction on speed of traffic on the highway as there had been past incidents of animals being crushed under speeding vehicles. Road signs have been put up and motorists asked to restrict speed to 40 kmph on the highway.